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File PDF document Joint statement To Cambodian Gvt re Tola Moeun
by Paul Roeland published 19-02-2018 last modified 19-02-2018 11:23 — filed under: ,
Located in img / pdf
Garment workers are waiting for an answer – will H&M deliver on its promise to pay a living wage in 2018?
by Christie Miedema published 25-11-2017 last modified 24-11-2017 09:26 — filed under: , , ,
Four years ago today, H&M made a bold promise that, if kept, would mean a game changer for the industry. On 25 November 2013, the company vowed to pay what H&M calls a ‘fair living wage’ to the garment workers in its supply chain by 2018. On the fourth anniversary of H&M’s historic statement, with 2018 just around the corner, Clean Clothes Campaign and global partners are greatly anticipating the moment next year when every garment worker that stitches clothes for H&M will receive a living wage.
Located in News / / 11 / 25
Brands must speak out about violations in Cambodia
by Ilona Kelly published 03-10-2017 — filed under: , , , ,
Labour rights organizations are deeply concerned about the closing of democratic and civil society space in Cambodia. This trend has recently escalated with alarming high-profile incidents of repression against political leaders, non-governmental organizations, and independent media. Clean Clothes Campaign, Worker Rights Consortium, and International Labor Rights Forum are calling on multinational apparel companies sourcing from Cambodia to take a stand against this repression, and to urge the Cambodian government to respect human rights and labour rights.
Located in News / / 10 / 03
M&S, Bonmarché and Nygård should compensate Cambodian workers after factory closure
by Christie Miedema published 11-07-2017 last modified 11-07-2017 07:50 — filed under: , , ,
The sudden closure of a garment factory linked to UK and Canadian brands has left 208 workers in Cambodia without jobs, salaries or compensation. A year later these workers, largely women, are still fighting for justice and are in a desperate situation. As they stitched clothes for UK brands Marks and Spencer and Bonmarché, as well as Canadian brand Nygård, the workers are demanding that these companies take responsibility and give them the legally due payments that their supplier failed to provide.
Located in News / / 07 / 11
Brands must intervene to win release of imprisoned labour leaders in Bangladesh
by Mirjam van Heugten published 19-01-2017 last modified 31-01-2017 15:33 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Twenty-two human and labour rights organizations from around the world are calling on H&M, C&A, Inditex, Gap and VF to press for the release of unjustly imprisoned Bangladeshi union leaders and worker rights advocates and the reinstatement of 1,500 workers suspended or terminated for taking part in a wage strike. Sign the petition!
Located in News / / 01 / 19
File ECMAScript program Invisible workers - Syrian refugees in Turkish garment factories
by Christie Miedema published 18-01-2017 last modified 18-01-2017 08:34 — filed under: , , ,
Thousands of Syrian refugees work long hours in Turkey’s apparel factories in unhealthy conditions with salaries below the minimum wage. Despite Turkey being an important sourcing market for the Nordic brands H&M, KappAhl, Lindex, Gina Tricot and Varner (BikBok, Cubus, Carlings et al), the companies are not doing enough to prevent discrimination of Syrians in their supply chains, according to this report by Fair Action and Future in our hands published in January 2017.
Located in Resources / Publications from National CCCs
Nordic fashion brands need to tackle abuse of Syrian refugees in Turkish garment factories
by Christie Miedema published 18-01-2017 last modified 18-01-2017 09:00 — filed under: , , ,
Thousands of Syrian refugees work long hours in Turkey’s apparel factories in unhealthy conditions with salaries below the minimum wage. Despite Turkey being an important sourcing market for the Nordic brands H&M, KappAhl, Lindex, Gina Tricot and Varner (BikBok, Cubus, Carlings et al), the companies are not doing enough to prevent discrimination of Syrians in their supply chains, according to a report by Fair Action and Future in our hands.
Located in News / / 01 / 18
Bangladeshi garment workers face mass firings and criminal charges
by Mirjam van Heugten published 05-01-2017 last modified 05-01-2017 14:51 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Since last month's wage protests began in Dhaka, Bangladesh thousands of workers along with several grass-roots worker organizations located in the region faced a series of repressive actions from their employers and the government. An estimated 2 - 3000 workers were fired, while numerous legal cases filed at the Ashulia police station accuse at least 1,500 unnamed workers and 150 named workers of vandalism, looting, threatening other workers, and assaulting factory officials. At least 13 union leaders and activists, many of whom had no association with the protests, were detained or arrested. As of January 4, 2017, at least 11 remain in police custody.
Located in News / / 01 / 05
CCC condemns escalating repression of unionists amid wage strikes Bangladesh
by Mirjam van Heugten published 24-12-2016 last modified 24-12-2016 10:25 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC) is today raising concerns about the safety of trade union leaders and workers in Bangladesh, after a number of labour activists and workers were arrested on apparently arbitrary grounds. The arrests have come in the wake of a week of unrest, as thousands of workers in the Ashulia area of Dhaka went on strike to demand higher wages.
Located in News / / 12 / 24
CCC reaction to the launch of children’s clothing collection by H&M and WWF
by Christie Miedema published 29-09-2016 last modified 29-09-2016 08:45 — filed under:
On 29th of September, H&M and WWF have launched a new collection of children’s clothing aimed at leading the way toward a more environmentally friendly garment industry. While H&M and WWF attempt to reduce water pollution and promote closed loop recycling management, core problems of their ‘fast fashion’ model are not addressed. H&M continues to pursue a business model that relies heavily on high sales volumes, rapid growth rates and overconsumption, and is therefore truly unsustainable at heart. The Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC) fears that the company is once again profiting from a marketing opportunity that will lead to little change for affected people and may mislead consumers.
Located in News / / 09 / 29